Update copyright notice to LGPL
[dyninst.git] / common / src / solarisKludges.C
1 /*
2  * Copyright (c) 1996-2007 Barton P. Miller
3  * 
4  * We provide the Paradyn Parallel Performance Tools (below
5  * described as "Paradyn") on an AS IS basis, and do not warrant its
6  * validity or performance.  We reserve the right to update, modify,
7  * or discontinue this software at any time.  We shall have no
8  * obligation to supply such updates or modifications or any other
9  * form of support to you.
10  * 
11  * By your use of Paradyn, you understand and agree that we (or any
12  * other person or entity with proprietary rights in Paradyn) are
13  * under no obligation to provide either maintenance services,
14  * update services, notices of latent defects, or correction of
15  * defects for Paradyn.
16  * 
17  * This library is free software; you can redistribute it and/or
18  * modify it under the terms of the GNU Lesser General Public
19  * License as published by the Free Software Foundation; either
20  * version 2.1 of the License, or (at your option) any later version.
21  * 
22  * This library is distributed in the hope that it will be useful,
23  * but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of
24  * MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.  See the GNU
25  * Lesser General Public License for more details.
26  * 
27  * You should have received a copy of the GNU Lesser General Public
28  * License along with this library; if not, write to the Free Software
29  * Foundation, Inc., 51 Franklin Street, Fifth Floor, Boston, MA  02110-1301  USA
30  */
31
32
33 // $Id: solarisKludges.C,v 1.7 2007/05/30 19:20:29 legendre Exp $
34
35 #include "common/h/headers.h"
36
37 void * P_memcpy (void *A1, const void *A2, size_t SIZE) {
38   return (memcpy(A1, A2, SIZE));
39 }
40
41 unsigned long long PDYN_div1000(unsigned long long in) {
42    /* Divides by 1000 without an integer division instruction or library call, both of
43     * which are slow.
44     * We do only shifts, adds, and subtracts.
45     *
46     * We divide by 1000 in this way:
47     * multiply by 1/1000, or multiply by (1/1000)*2^30 and then right-shift by 30.
48     * So what is 1/1000 * 2^30?
49     * It is 1,073,742.   (actually this is rounded)
50     * So we can multiply by 1,073,742 and then right-shift by 30 (neat, eh?)
51     *
52     * Now for multiplying by 1,073,742...
53     * 1,073,742 = (1,048,576 + 16384 + 8192 + 512 + 64 + 8 + 4 + 2)
54     * or, slightly optimized:
55     * = (1,048,576 + 16384 + 8192 + 512 + 64 + 16 - 2)
56     * for a total of 8 shifts and 6 add/subs, or 14 operations.
57     *
58     */
59
60    unsigned long long temp = in << 20; // multiply by 1,048,576
61       // beware of overflow; left shift by 20 is quite a lot.
62       // If you know that the input fits in 32 bits (4 billion) then
63       // no problem.  But if it's much bigger then start worrying...
64
65    temp += in << 14; // 16384
66    temp += in << 13; // 8192
67    temp += in << 9;  // 512
68    temp += in << 6;  // 64
69    temp += in << 4;  // 16
70    temp -= in >> 2;  // 2
71
72    return (temp >> 30); // divide by 2^30
73 }
74
75 unsigned long long PDYN_divMillion(unsigned long long in) {
76    /* Divides by 1,000,000 without an integer division instruction or library call,
77     * both of which are slow.
78     * We do only shifts, adds, and subtracts.
79     *
80     * We divide by 1,000,000 in this way:
81     * multiply by 1/1,000,000, or multiply by (1/1,000,000)*2^30 and then right-shift
82     * by 30.  So what is 1/1,000,000 * 2^30?
83     * It is 1,074.   (actually this is rounded)
84     * So we can multiply by 1,074 and then right-shift by 30 (neat, eh?)
85     *
86     * Now for multiplying by 1,074
87     * 1,074 = (1024 + 32 + 16 + 2)
88     * for a total of 4 shifts and 4 add/subs, or 8 operations.
89     *
90     * Note: compare with div1000 -- it's cheaper to divide by a million than
91     *       by a thousand (!)
92     *
93     */
94
95    unsigned long long temp = in << 10; // multiply by 1024
96       // beware of overflow...if the input arg uses more than 52 bits
97       // than start worrying about whether (in << 10) plus the smaller additions
98       // we're gonna do next will fit in 64...
99
100    temp += in << 5; // 32
101    temp += in << 4; // 16
102    temp += in << 1; // 2
103
104    return (temp >> 30); // divide by 2^30
105 }
106
107 unsigned long long PDYN_mulMillion(unsigned long long in) {
108    unsigned long long result = in;
109
110    /* multiply by 125 by multiplying by 128 and subtracting 3x */
111    result = (result << 7) - result - result - result;
112
113    /* multiply by 125 again, for a total of 15625x */
114    result = (result << 7) - result - result - result;
115
116    /* multiply by 64, for a total of 1,000,000x */
117    result <<= 6;
118
119    /* cost was: 3 shifts and 6 subtracts
120     * cost of calling mul1000(mul1000()) would be: 6 shifts and 4 subtracts
121     *
122     * Another algorithm is to multiply by 2^6 and then 5^6.
123     * The former is super-cheap (one shift); the latter is more expensive.
124     * 5^6 = 15625 = 16384 - 512 - 256 + 8 + 1
125     * so multiplying by 5^6 means 4 shift operations and 4 add/sub ops
126     * so multiplying by 1000000 means 5 shift operations and 4 add/sub ops.
127     * That may or may not be cheaper than what we're doing (3 shifts; 6 subtracts);
128     * I'm not sure.  --ari
129     */
130
131    return result;
132 }